Skip to main content
  1. SEO glossary/

Orphan Page

5 mins

What is it? #

Orphan Page: A web page that is not linked to by any other page within the same website or external sources, making it difficult to find and access. It is like a page that has been abandoned or orphaned, with no connections to the rest of the web.

Here are some examples: #

An orphan page, in the context of web development, is a page on a website that has no incoming links from other pages on the same website. These pages are considered “orphans” because they are not connected to the rest of the website’s content. Here are some examples of where orphan pages are used:

  1. Landing pages: Landing pages are designed to capture a visitor’s attention and encourage them to take a specific action, such as signing up for a newsletter or making a purchase. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are designed to stand alone and focus on a single goal.

  2. Microsites: Microsites are small, independent websites that are created for a specific purpose or campaign. They may have their own unique design and navigation, and are often not linked to the main website. This makes them orphan pages, as they have no incoming links from the rest of the website.

  3. Blog posts: In some cases, blog posts can become orphan pages if they are not linked to from other posts or pages on the website. This can happen when a blog post is published and then forgotten about, or if it is not relevant to any other content on the website.

  4. FAQ pages: Frequently asked questions (FAQ) pages are designed to provide quick answers to common questions. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  5. Contact pages: Contact pages are designed to provide visitors with a way to get in touch with the website’s owner or administrator. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  6. Brochure pages: Brochure pages are designed to provide visitors with information about a company’s products or services. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  7. Social media pages: Social media pages, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, are designed to be stand-alone pages that represent a company or individual. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  8. Guest post pages: Guest post pages are designed to showcase content from guest authors. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  9. Archive pages: Archive pages are designed to provide visitors with access to older content that is no longer relevant or necessary for the main website. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

  10. 404 error pages: 404 error pages are designed to provide visitors with an error message when a page cannot be found. These pages often have no incoming links from other pages on the website, as they are meant to be easily accessible and stand alone.

In Summary #

Orphan Page is a term used in the context of web development and search engine optimization (SEO) to describe a web page that is not linked to by any other pages on the same website or by external websites. These pages are considered “orphans” because they are isolated and do not share any relationships with other pages, making them difficult to find and navigate.

In the world of SEO, orphan pages are considered problematic because they can negatively impact a website’s search engine rankings. Search engines like Google use complex algorithms to determine the relevance and authority of web pages, and one of the factors they consider is the number of incoming and outgoing links a page has. Orphan pages, by definition, have no incoming or outgoing links, which can make them appear less relevant and authoritative in the eyes of search engines.

To address the issue of orphan pages, web developers and SEO professionals can take several steps, such as:

  1. Conducting a thorough audit of a website’s internal linking structure to identify any orphan pages.
  2. Adding internal links to orphan pages from other relevant pages on the same website.
  3. Encouraging external websites to link to the orphan page, either through outreach or by creating valuable content that others will want to share.
  4. Implementing a “related content” feature on a website to automatically link to similar pages, potentially including orphan pages.
  5. Utilizing social media platforms to share orphan page content and encourage others to link to it.

By addressing the issue of orphan pages, web developers and SEO professionals can improve a website’s overall structure, make it easier for users to navigate, and potentially boost its search engine rankings.