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Link Rot

3 mins

What is it? #

Link rot, also known as link decay, is a phenomenon that occurs when hyperlinks on a webpage become outdated or irrelevant due to changes in the structure or content of the linked website. This can lead to a number of issues, including broken links, redirect loops, or the display of incorrect or irrelevant information. Link rot is a common problem on the internet, as websites are constantly being updated, moved, or taken down, making it difficult to maintain accurate and up-to-date links. To combat link rot, webmasters and content creators should regularly review and update their links, as well as implement practices such as using permanent URLs and link checkers to ensure the integrity of their content.

Here are some examples: #

Link rot is used in various contexts, including:

  1. Websites and blogs: When a website or blog links to another site that is no longer active or has been moved, the link is said to be rotten. This can happen due to website closures, domain name changes, or server issues.

Example: “I recently discovered that many of the links on my blog are rotten, leading to error messages or unrelated content. I need to update them to provide a better user experience.”

  1. Online forums and discussion boards: When a user posts a link to an external source, and the link becomes inactive or leads to an unrelated page, it is considered link rot.

Example: “I was reading an old thread on a forum, and most of the links posted by users are rotten, making it difficult to find the relevant information.”

  1. Social media platforms: When a user shares a link on a social media platform, and the link becomes inactive or leads to an unrelated page, it is considered link rot.

Example: “I noticed that many of the links shared on my social media feed are rotten, making it frustrating for users who want to access the content.”

  1. Online directories and listings: When a directory or listing site links to a business or service that is no longer active or has been moved, the link is said to be rotten.

Example: “I was searching for a local business in an online directory, and many of the links were rotten, making it difficult to find the information I needed.”

  1. Academic and research sources: When a research paper or academic source cites a link that is no longer active or leads to an unrelated page, it is considered link rot.

Example: “I was reading a research paper and noticed that many of the cited links were rotten, making it difficult to access the referenced content.”

  1. Government and legal documents: When a government or legal document links to an external source that is no longer active or leads to an unrelated page, it is considered link rot.

Example: “I was reviewing a government report and noticed that many of the links were rotten, making it difficult to access the relevant information.”

In Summary #

Link rot, also known as link decay, is a phenomenon where web links become outdated or broken over time. This can happen for various reasons, such as websites being taken down, moved, or updated, or due to typos or incorrect URLs. Link rot can cause frustration for users and can negatively impact a website’s search engine optimization (SEO). To prevent link rot, it is essential to regularly check and update links, use permanent URLs, and consider using link checker tools.