Skip to main content
  1. SEO glossary/

Core Web Vitals

4 mins

What is it? #

Core Web Vitals (CWV) is a set of metrics developed by Google to measure the performance, stability, and user experience of web pages. These metrics are considered essential for a healthy and user-friendly website, as they provide insights into the quality of the user experience and help identify areas for improvement. The three primary Core Web Vitals are:

  1. Largest Contentful Paint (LCP): This metric measures the time it takes for the largest element on a web page to load and become visible to the user. A good LCP score is under 2.5 seconds, as it indicates that the page is loading quickly and providing a better user experience.

  2. First Input Delay (FID): This metric measures the time it takes for a web page to respond to a user’s first interaction, such as clicking a button or linking to another page. A good FID score is under 100 milliseconds, as it indicates that the page is responsive and interactive, providing a better user experience.

  3. Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS): This metric measures the amount of unexpected layout shift that occurs during the loading of a web page. A good CLS score is under 0.1, as it indicates that the page layout is stable and does not cause unexpected movements or jumps, providing a better user experience.

Core Web Vitals are crucial for website owners and developers, as they help identify areas for improvement and optimize the overall performance and user experience of a website. By focusing on these metrics, website owners can ensure that their site is providing a fast, responsive, and stable experience for their users, ultimately leading to higher user satisfaction and better search engine rankings.

Here are some examples: #

Core Web Vitals are used in various places, including:

  1. Google Search: Core Web Vitals are a ranking factor in Google search results. Websites with better performance, accessibility, and user experience, as measured by Core Web Vitals, may rank higher in search results.

  2. Google Ads: Google Ads uses Core Web Vitals to evaluate the quality of ad experiences. Ads that lead to websites with poor Core Web Vital scores may be penalized with lower ad rankings or even disapproved.

  3. Google Analytics: Core Web Vitals are integrated into Google Analytics, allowing website owners to track and analyze their performance, accessibility, and user experience metrics.

  4. Google Search Console: Core Web Vitals are reported in Google Search Console, helping website owners identify areas for improvement and track their progress.

  5. Web.dev: Web.dev is a Google-developed website that provides tools and resources for improving website performance, accessibility, and user experience. Core Web Vitals are prominently featured in the site’s audits and recommendations.

  6. Lighthouse: Lighthouse is an open-source tool for auditing website performance, accessibility, and user experience. Core Web Vitals are a key part of Lighthouse’s audits and recommendations.

  7. Browser extensions: Various browser extensions, such as Google’s PageSpeed Insights, use Core Web Vitals to evaluate website performance and provide suggestions for improvement.

  8. Web hosting providers: Some web hosting providers, such as Google Cloud Platform, use Core Web Vitals to evaluate the performance of websites hosted on their platforms and provide optimization recommendations.

  9. Developer tools: Core Web Vitals are integrated into various developer tools, such as Google Chrome DevTools, to help developers identify and fix performance, accessibility, and user experience issues.

  10. Industry events and conferences: Core Web Vitals are often discussed at industry events and conferences, as they have become an important factor in website performance optimization and user experience improvement.

In Summary #

Core Web Vitals are a set of metrics that measure the performance and user experience of web pages. They include Largest Contentful Paint (LCP), First Input Delay (FID), and Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS). LCP measures the time it takes for the largest element on a page to load, FID measures the time it takes for a user’s first interaction with a page to be processed, and CLS measures the amount of unexpected layout shift that occurs during the loading process. These metrics help developers and site owners identify areas for improvement and optimize their websites for a better user experience.