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Broken Link

3 mins

What is it? #

A broken link, also known as a dead link, is a hyperlink on a web page that points to a web resource that is no longer available or has been moved to a different location. When a user clicks on a broken link, they are usually presented with an error message or a page that does not exist. Broken links can be caused by various reasons, such as the removal or renaming of a web page, the expiration of a domain, or an incorrect URL. It is essential to maintain and update the links on a website to ensure a seamless user experience and to prevent potential loss of traffic and revenue.

Here are some examples: #

(Broken Link) is used to indicate a link that is no longer active or accessible. Here are some examples of where (Broken Link) is used:

  1. In a web page or blog post, when referring to a link that is no longer working.

Example: “Unfortunately, the link to the video is (Broken Link).”

  1. In a forum or discussion board, when providing a link that is no longer accessible.

Example: “I tried to access the file through the provided link, but it’s (Broken Link).”

  1. In an email or message, when sharing a link that is no longer working.

Example: “I wanted to show you the cute cat video, but the link is (Broken Link).”

  1. In a social media post, when referring to a link that is no longer accessible.

Example: “I found a great article on how to train your dog, but the link is (Broken Link).”

  1. In a presentation or document, when providing a link that is no longer working.

Example: “For more information, please visit the following link: (Broken Link).”

  1. In a video or audio recording, when referring to a link that is no longer accessible.

Example: “I’ll provide the link to the transcript in the video description, but it’s currently (Broken Link).”

  1. In a podcast or radio show, when providing a link that is no longer working.

Example: “We’ll have the link to the survey on our website, but it’s temporarily (Broken Link).”

  1. In a print publication, when providing a link that is no longer accessible.

Example: “For additional resources, please visit the following link: (Broken Link).”

  1. In a television show or news broadcast, when referring to a link that is no longer working.

Example: “The link to the live stream is (Broken Link), but we’ll provide an update when it’s back online.”

  1. In a voice message or phone call, when providing a link that is no longer accessible.

Example: “I’ll send you the link to the recipe, but it’s currently (Broken Link).”

In Summary #

The article discusses the concept of “broken links” in the context of the internet, which refers to hyperlinks that point to web pages or resources that are no longer available or have been moved. It explains that broken links can be caused by various reasons, such as website owners removing or updating content, or search engines not updating their indexes. The article suggests that it is essential to maintain the integrity of the internet by ensuring that links remain accurate and up-to-date, as broken links can lead to user frustration and loss of trust in the website or search engine. It concludes by emphasizing the importance of regular website maintenance and search engine optimization to prevent broken links and ensure a seamless user experience on the internet.